The dangerous temptations of literature

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I read The Little House in the Big Forest as a child and, although I have forgotten much of it, one scene in particular has stayed with me. I am of course thinking of the time they made candy out of maple syrup. As a child the thought of making candy in the snow was endlessly fascinating to me and I lamented the lack of sugar maples in Sweden.

However, it is said that it is never to late to have a happy childhood and I finally realized that I didn’t need a sugar maple, just ordinary maple syrup and the fresh new-fallen snow outside. Tonight I have finally fulfilled that particular childhood dream and although I may have eaten a bit too much I have no regrets. Thank you Laura Ingalls Wilder!

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16 thoughts on “The dangerous temptations of literature

    1. I think it went well, although I don’t know how it should taste. It was very easy, the syrup reached 113C in no time and then I just poured it on the packed snow and had tasty candy.

      I’d like to try doing it outside on a fire at some point, that could be a lot of fun!

      Liked by 2 people

  1. If it tasted like maple syrup, then you did it right! And depending on how long you heated the syrup, the candy will be either crunchy or chewy. But however it turned out, what a great way to celebrate Wilder’s book.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow! Every time I read one of Enid Blyton’s picnics as a child, I drooled – there were cakes and scones, sandwiches, butter, jams and jellies, and I yearned to take part in their adventurous picnics. After reading your post, I am inspired to set up a similar picnic basket for the family and head out in Spring 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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